Charles Lipson
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E-mail: [email protected]

 

Charles Lipson

Peter B. Ritzma Professor

Political Science Department

University of Chicago

5828 S. University Ave.

Chicago, IL 60637

 

 

Big Wars: Ancient, Medieval and Early Modern

Political Science 291& 391
Charles Lipson

University of Chicago
Syllabus-Autumn 2011

Course Time: 1:30-2:50 Monday, Wednesday Prof. Lipson's office is Pick 418b
Classroom: Kent 120 Office Hours: Wednesdays, 3-4:30
Please note: There will be a lecture on Monday of Thanksgiving Week, but not on Wed. E-mail: [email protected]
Sections assigned in second week. Ee-mails about this course should include PS291 somewhere in subject line.

Course Description

This is a survey course on major wars, primarily in Europe, from ancient Greece to the mid-1700s. (We will not cover modern industrial warfare since other courses cover that topic.) The focus here is on politics and international relations--the origins and consequences of wars--and on the evolution of military technologies rather than the details of battles or military strategy.

This course requires substantial readings. Lectures use multimedia extensively, featuring maps, graphs, and paintings. Lecture notes and PowerPoint presentations are not available online.

This course is intended for advanced undergraduates and graduate students in the social sciences, particularly those working on international relations. Its goal is to provide historical grounding for theorizing about international relations. There is no prerequisite for this course. This is one of five related courses I offer on the history of international politics, each of which can be taken independently.

   
Undergrad & Grad     

World Politics from the 1490s to 1815: A History

Political Science 213 & 323
Great Power Politics in the Nineteenth Century: A History Political Science 214 & 324
World Politics in the Twentieth Century, 1914-45: A History Political Science 215 & 325
The Cold War, 1945-91: A History Political Science 216 & 326
Big Wars: Ancient, Medieval, and Early Modern Political Science 291 & 392

Basic Course Requirements

There are several required books for the course, listed below, plus some PDFs available on Chalk.

  • There will be three in-class exams, one for each module of the course. There will be no final exam and no papers.
  • Reading assignments are not broken down, week by week, although your TAs may request that you do certain readings for their sections. Otherwise, simply read through the materials for the module we are working on.
  1. Module I: Ancient Wars: Peloponnesian and Punic
  2. Module II: Medieval and Renaissance Wars: Hundred Years War, Wars for Italy
  3. Module III: Early Modern Wars: Wars of Louis XIV, Seven Years' War
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Goals of this Course

1. Provide a concise, general history of international and diplomatic events and sequences, especially those bearing on larger polities of their era;

2. Draw connections, where possible, between the historical materials and analytic questions of interest to IR theorists;

3. Incorporate technology and international economic issues, which are too often slighted in political and diplomatic histories. They should be included for two reasons:

Administrative Details

Books are available at UC/Barnes & Noble Bookstore and the Seminary Cooperative Bookstore and are on short-term reserve at the Regenstein Library.
A Chalk site is associated with this course. Documents listed as "PDF at Chalk" can be found under course documents at the Chalk site.
Slides for each lecture are posted on Chalk, under "Labs/Lectures." Slides are in PDF format and are posted shortly after each lecture.
Undergraduates normally enroll in PS 291.
Graduate students enroll in PS 391.
Students have weekly discussion sections, which will be assigned in Week 2.
There will be only one lecture during Thanksgiving Week, on Monday. There is no lecture on Wednesday. Only sections scheduled for Monday or Tuesday will meet that week.

There will be three in-class exams, no papers and no final.
Extra time will be alloted for students with learning disabilities or who are non-native English speakers. Please let your TA know in advance and bring the necessary paperwork.
The class grade will be based on the three exams plus your attendance and active participation in sections.

Exams for Each Module

There will be three in-class exams, one for each module. They will incorporate materials from lectures and assigned readings. There are no papers and no final.

Each exam will focus on the module we just covered but may ask for integration of materials from earlier modules, as well.

The format of each exam will include an ID/Timeline and an essay question.

The essay will focus on one of the major themes of the course.

The timeline/ID section will ask you to identify and briefly describe several major actors or events in that time period.

These are "closed book" exams, meaning that you cannot use notes, books, or other materials--just what's in your head!

Extra time on the exam will be routinely given to students with recognized learning disabilities and those for whom English is a second- or third-language.

Please bring one or two blue blooks to each exam. They are available in the Barnes & Noble University of Chicago Bookstore.

Make-up Exams for Each Module

Some students must miss the regular exam date because of illness or other excusable reasons. Students may take a make-up only after they have received Prof. Lipson's written permission. They should seek that permission before the regular exam is given.

How to Request a Make-Up: Students must make a written request for a make-up exam and clearly state why the regular exam could not be taken (for example, a serious family illness). This email request must be sent to three people in a single email:

  1. Me
  2. Your TA, and
  3. Your college adviser.

I will respond to that email, saying whether or not you have permission to take the make-up exam, and will copy my response to your TA and college adviser.

When is the Make-Up Exam Given?
The make-up exam is given only once, exactly one week after the regular exam, immediately after the regular class lecture that day. If the original exam was on a Monday, for example, then the make-up will be the following Monday. It will last 80 minutes. Please bring 2 bluebooks, just as you would for the regular exam.

Graduate Student Options

Graduate students in Political Science, CIR, and MAPSS have three options for course grades. (Any other graduate students need to see me individually and discuss your options.)

  1. Take the three regular in-class exams, the same as undergraduates.
  2. Write three short papers, one for each module. Papers should be 1200-2400 words and should cover a topic of your choice that is directly related to each module. Each paper is due on the Monday following that module's exam.
  3. Write one longer paper, covering any topic related to the course. The paper should be approximately 8000 words and is due the Monday of exam week.

These options are available only to graduate students and not to undergraduates enrolled in the course.

There is no special discussion section for graduate students, but you may sit in on any undergraduate section that is convenient. I am also happy to meet with you to discuss topics related to the class.

Modules, Lecture Topics, and Assigned Readings

Overview: Explaining War
Blue Square Neiberg, Michael. Warfare in World History. London ; New York: Routledge, 2001. Required book
U27 .N45 2001

Blue Square Rotberg, Robert I., Theodore K. Rabb, and Robert Gilpin, eds. The Origin and Prevention of Major Wars. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1989. Articles by Nye, Gilpin, and Waltz.

  • Nye, Joseph S. “Old Wars and Future Wars: Causation and Prevention”
  • Gilpin, Robert. “The Theory of Hegemonic War”
  • Waltz, Kenneth N. “The Origins of War in Neorealist Theory”
Required book
U21.2.O720 1989
Also, PDFs at Chalk
Blue Square Fearon, James D. “Rationalist Explanations for War.” International Organization 49 (Summer 1995). Pp. 379-414. PDF at Chalk
Module I: Ancient Wars (Peloponnesian, Punic)
Peloponnesian War (431 BC - 404 BC): Athenian Empire v. Sparta + allies
Blue Square "Peloponnesian War." In Cowley, Robert and Geoffrey Parker, eds. The Reader's Companion to Military History. Boston: Houghton Mifflin 1996. pp. 358-59. PDF at Chalk
U27.R3480 1996
Blue Square Kagan, Donald. On the Origins of War and the Preservation of Peace. New York: Doubleday, 1995, Chapter 1. Required book
D25.5.K270 1995
Blue Square Addington, Larry H. The Patterns of War through the Eighteenth Century. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1990. Chapter 1 (pp. 16-17). Required book
U27.A2940 1990
Blue Square Selections from Thucydides in The Greek Historians : The Essence of Herodotus, Thucydides, Xenophon, Polybius. M. I. Finley, ed.. New York: Penguin Books, 1978. (skim the materials on pp. 226-78; 298-379). Required book
DF13.F56 1978 
Punic Wars (three wars from 264 BC - 146 BC): Rome v. Carthage
Blue Square "Punic Wars." In Cowley, Robert and Geoffrey Parker, eds. The Reader's Companion to Military History. Boston: Houghton Mifflin 1996. pp. 358-59. PDF at Chalk
U27.R3480 1996
Blue Square Kamm, Antony, The Romans: An Introduction. London: Routledge, 1995, pp. 20-22; 25-30 (good, brief overview of the war). PDF at Chalk
DG231.K230 1995
Blue Square Kagan, Donald. On the Origins of War and the Preservation of Peace. New York: Doubleday, 1995, Chapter 3. Required book
D25.5.K270 1995
Blue Square Addington, Larry H. The Patterns of War through the Eighteenth Century. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1990. Chapter 2 (pp. 26-32). Required book
U27.A2940 1990
Blue Square Selections from Thucydides in The Greek Historians : The Essence of Herodotus, Thucydides, Xenophon, Polybius. M. I. Finley, ed.. New York: Penguin Books, 1978. (skim the materials on pp. 226-78; 298-379). Required book
DF13.F56 1978 
Magenta Square In-class exam at the completion of Module I.  

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Module II: Medieval and Renaissance Wars (Hundred Years, Wars for Italy)
Hundred Years War (1339-1453): England v. France
Blue Square "Hundred Years' War." In Cowley, Robert and Geoffrey Parker, eds. The Reader's Companion to Military History. Boston: Houghton Mifflin 1996. pp. 214-15. PDF at Chalk
U27.R3480 1996
Blue Square Allmand, C. T. The Hundred Years War : England and France at War, c. 1300-c. 1450. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1988. Required book
DC96.A440 1988
Blue Square Addington, Larry H. The Patterns of War through the Eighteenth Century. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1990. Chapter 3. Required book
U27.A2940 1990
Wars for Italy (1494-1559): France v. Holy Roman Empire
Blue Square "Italian Wars." In Cowley, Robert and Geoffrey Parker, eds. The Reader's Companion to Military History. Boston: Houghton Mifflin 1996. pp. 231-32. PDF at Chalk
U27.R3480 1996
Blue Square Greengrass, Mark. “Politics and Warfare.” In Cameron, Euan, ed. The Sixteenth Century. New York: Oxford University Press, 2006. pp. 78-84 (portion of chapter) PDF at Chalk
D229.S59 2006
Blue Square Black, Jeremy. "European Warfare, 1494-1559." In Black, European Warfare, 1494-1660. London: Routledge, 2002. pp. 69-96. PDF at Chalk
D214.B53 2002
Blue Square Addington, Larry H. The Patterns of War through the Eighteenth Century. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1990. Chapter 4 (pp. 74-79). Required book
U27.A2940 1990
Magenta Square In-class exam at the completion of Module II.  

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Module III: Early Modern Wars (Wars of Louis XIV, Seven Years' War)
Wars of Louis XIV (1667-1714): France v. Holland + England + coalition
Blue Square "Louis XIV." In Cowley, Robert and Geoffrey Parker, eds. The Reader's Companion to Military History. Boston: Houghton Mifflin 1996. pp. 269-70. PDF at Chalk
U27.R3480 1996
Blue Square Parrott, David. “War and International Relations,” In Bergin, Joseph, ed. The Short Oxford History of Europe. the Seventeenth Century : Europe, 1598-1715. Oxford ; New York: Oxford University Press, 2001. pp. 112-144. PDF at Chalk
D246.S44 2001
Blue Square Black, Jeremy. "Louis XIV's Foreign Policy," section of Black, "Warfare, Crisis, and Absolutism," in Cameron, Euan, ed. Early Modern Europe: An Oxford History. Oxford ; New York: Oxford University Press, 1999. pp. 222-226. PDF at Chalk
D228.E187 1999
Blue Square Black, Jeremy. "Louis XIV and Europe: French Foreign Policy, 1661-1715." In Black, From Louis XIV to Napoleon : The Fate of a Great Power. London: UCL Press, 1999. pp. 33-69. PDF at Chalk
DC110.B53 1999
Blue Square Addington, Larry H. The Patterns of War through the Eighteenth Century. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1990. Chapter 4 (pp. 92-96). Required book
U27.A2940 1990
Seven Years War (1756-63): Britain + Prussia v. France + Austria
Blue Square "Seven Years' War." In Cowley, Robert and Geoffrey Parker, eds. The Reader's Companion to Military History. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1996. pp. 422-23. PDF at Chalk
U27.R3480 1996
Blue Square Overview of Seven Years' War in Palmer, R. R., Joel G. Colton, and Lloyd S. Kramer. A History of the Modern World. 9th ed. Boston: McGraw-Hill, 2002. pp. 249-263 PDF at Chalk
D209.P26 2002
Blue Square Lynn, John A. “International Rivalry and Warfare.” In Blanning, T. C. W., ed. The Short Oxford History of Europe. the Eighteenth Century : Europe, 1688-1815. New York: Oxford University Press, 2000, pp. 178-217 PDF at Chalk
D209.P26 2007
Blue Square Addington, Larry H. The Patterns of War through the Eighteenth Century. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1990. Chapter 6 (pp. 118-130). Required book
U27.A2940 1990
American Revolution (1775-83): Britain v. British colonies in North America (U.S.)
Blue Square Addington, Larry H. The Patterns of War through the Eighteenth Century. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1990. pp. 139-40; 144-45. Required book
PDF at Chalk
U27.A2940 1990
Magenta Square In-class exam at the completion of Module III.  

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Required Books

The readings rely on the following books, which you should purchase. For your convenience, I have included the call numbers.
  Call Number ISBN Paperback
Addington, Larry H. The Patterns of War through the Eighteenth Century. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1990. U27.A2940 1990 0253205514
Allmand, C. T. The Hundred Years War : England and France at War, c. 1300-c. 1450. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1988. DC96.A440 1988 0521319234
Finley, M. I., ed. The Greek Historians : The Essence of Herodotus, Thucydides, Xenophon, Polybius. Harmondsworth, Eng.; New York: Penguin Books, 1978. (Same as The Portable Greek Historians)
DF13.F56 1978 014015065X
Kagan, Donald. On the Origins of War and the Preservation of Peace. New York: Doubleday, 1995.
D25.5.K270 1995 0385423756
Neiberg, Michael. Warfare in World History. London ; New York: Routledge, 2001.
U27 .N45 2001 0415229553
Rotberg, Robert I., Theodore K. Rabb, and Robert Gilpin, eds. The Origin and Prevention of Major Wars. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1989.
U21.2.O720 1989 0521379555
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